Tag Archives: Saving for Retirement

National Retirement Security Week 2016

This year’s National Retirement Security Week runs from October 16 through 22. It’s a good time to reflect on your personal financial goals and see if you’re on target to meet them. You can ask yourself questions like, “Will I have enough income when I’m retired?” If the answer isn’t clear, you can start taking steps to improve your retirement security.

The Three-Legged Stool: An Example of Retirement Security

Think of your future retirement as a three-legged stool. Each leg represents a different income source that can support you in retirement. The first leg of the stool is your NYSLRS defined benefit pension. Your NYSLRS pension will provide you with a monthly benefit for life based on your service credit and final average salary. The second leg on the stool is your Social Security benefit. Your Social Security benefit is based on how much you earned during your working career. For more details about your Social Security benefit, please visit the Social Security Administration’s website.

The third leg is your own personal savings, such as your own bank or investment accounts. Your personal savings can bridge the gap between what your NYSLRS pension and Social Security will provide. All together, these three legs can support you over the course of your retirement.
Retirement Security in 5 Steps

Ways to Save for Retirement

If you haven’t been maintaining your personal savings, you should start saving as early as possible. The best way to get into the savings habit is to just do it. Here are some suggestions to get into the saving habit:

Also consider looking into accounts that use compound interest. When your money is compounded, it increases in value by earning interest on both the principal and accumulated interest. That way, the more time your money has to grow, the better off you’ll be.

Remember, retirement security just doesn’t happen – it takes planning. You can learn more about retirement planning and our 5 Step Plan for achieving your financial goals on our website.

Who Are Financial Planners?

When you’re preparing for retirement, you want to avoid costly mistakes. And while hiring an attorney or accountant may help, think about hiring a financial planner too. A financial planner can help you develop a practical plan to help you meet your retirement goals.

What Do Financial Planners Do?

Financial planners do not manage your money. According to the Financial Planning Association of Massachusetts, financial planners assess your current financial health. They examine your assets, liabilities, income, and more. They help you develop a realistic plan to meet your goals by looking at your financial weaknesses and strengths. With their help, you can put your plan into action and keep track of its progress. If your goals change over time, they can also help you adjust your plan.

Choosing a Financial Planner

Retirement-Savings_5-Rules-to-RememberIf a financial planner has a CFP next to his or her name, that means they are a certified financial planner. Certified financial planners have passed a national test given by the Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards. The certification test covers:

  • Insurance
  • Investments
  • Taxation
  • Employee benefits
  • Retirement and estate planning

Certified financial planners must also abide by a code of ethics.

Do Your Research

Choosing a financial planner is like hiring any other professional. Make sure you do your research so you can make a well-founded decision. While we can’t offer specific advice about hiring a financial planner, there are some things you should keep in mind:

  • Check credentials, educational background and experience.
  • Find out if he or she is a member of the Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards.
  • Get referrals from people you trust – ask friends, relatives and business associates.
  • And finally, don’t be afraid to ask questions:
    • Do they research the financial products they recommend?
    • Do they offer a free consultation?
    • Are they paid by fee, commission, or salary?