Tag Archives: pension

NYSLRS’ Top Five Retirement Myths from 2015

Retirement Myths vs FactsFrom the day you become a NYSLRS member to the day you retire, you’re exposed to all sorts of retirement information. Unfortunately, sometimes what you learn can get jumbled along the way. We want to help clear up some common misconceptions we’ve heard from members and retirees over the past year. Here are the top five retirement myths from 2015:


Myth #1 “I’ll receive the full amount of my monthly retirement benefit when my payments start.”

Fact For the first few months of retirement, most NYSLRS retirees will receive partial payments while we finish calculating their final benefit. (We need to collect information on final payments and pensionable leave credits from their employers, a process that can take some time.) The partial payments are based on their most recent NYSLRS retirement estimate and usually make up 90 – 95 percent of their final benefit. Partial payments are paid by check and mailed to the address we have on file for the retiree.


Myth #2 “Family members always receive death benefits.”

Fact With the exception of accidental death benefits, NYSLRS members may name any person, trust, or organization as their beneficiary to receive death benefits. It doesn’t have to be a family member. Accidental death benefit recipients are outlined in the law.


Myth #3 “I can’t collect my pension until I start receiving Social Security.”

Fact Members can apply for retirement as soon as they meet the eligibility requirements of their retirement plan.


Myth #4 “NYSLRS manages my retiree health insurance.”

Fact NYSLRS does not administer health insurance programs for its retirees. We deduct premiums from a retiree’s monthly retirement benefit to pay for their health insurance if we’re told to do so by their former employer.

(If you have questions about your health insurance coverage or premium deductions, please contact your former employer. If you retired from a New York State agency, you can contact the New York State Department of Civil Service.)


Myth #5 “NYSLRS decides when there’s a retirement incentive.”

Fact This isn’t the case. The New York State Legislature (not NYSLRS) enacts retirement incentive programs. Incentives are approved by both houses and signed into law by the Governor. NYSLRS administers programs that are signed into law.


Check out your plan publication to learn more about your benefits. You can also visit our website for more information.

NYSLRS Basics: Understanding Your Final Average Salary

As a NYSLRS member, you have a defined benefit pension plan. With a defined benefit plan, you’ll receive a lifetime pension benefit based on a formula set by law that uses service credit and final average salary as part of the pension calculation. You’re probably familiar with service credit – it’s the years of service you earn while working with a participating employer. But what is a final average salary?

When we calculate your pension, we look at a specific set of years when your earnings were highest. We take the average of these earnings to create your final average salary. For most members, your final average salary is based on the years just before you retire. However, the years of earnings we use to calculate your final average salary may not match up to a calendar year or the New York fiscal year. For the purposes of calculating your final average salary, each “year” represents earnings during a time that equals one full-time year of service credit.

Types of Final Average Salary

Your tier and plan determines how we calculate your final average salary:NYSLRS Basics: Understanding your Final Average Salary

  • Three-Year Final Average Salary: for all members in Tier 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5.
  • Five-Year Final Average Salary: for all members in Tier 6.
  • One-Year Final Average Salary: only for members in the Police and Fire Retirement System (PFRS). This benefit must be adopted by your employer. It’s not available to PFRS members covered by Article 14 and generally not available to PFRS Tier 6 members.

Find out more about how the final average salary is calculated and the limits for each membership tier on our website.

Want to read more NYSLRS Basics? Check out our posts on when you can retire and choosing your pension payment option.

Dual Membership in NYSLRS

As a New York State and Local Retirement System (NYSLRS) member, you’re either part of the Employees’ Retirement System (ERS) or the Police and Fire Retirement System (PFRS). In some cases, however, it’s possible to have a dual membership, or be a member of both systems. As of last year, 3,392 members had memberships in both ERS and PFRS.

How Does Dual Membership Work?

You can be a member of more than one retirement system if you hold a different position in each system. Let’s say you work as a fire fighter—this would mean that you’re already a member of PFRS. One day, you decide to take on a part-time job as a bus driver for your local school district. Your school district participates in ERS, so you’re eligible for ERS membership. After you fill out the membership application, you’re now an ERS member, while at the same time being a PFRS member.

As a member of both systems, you’d have separate membership accounts in those systems. Let’s look again at our fire-fighting bus driver example. While working as a fire fighter, you’d make any required contributions and earn service credit toward your PFRS pension. The PFRS contributions and service credit wouldn’t go toward your ERS pension. The same goes when you’d work as a bus driver—your required contributions and earned service credit would go toward your ERS pension and not PFRS.

There are other implications to dual membership as well. Assuming you met the service credit and age requirements, you could retire from both systems. You’d need to file a separate retirement application for ERS and PFRS, and we’d work on calculating each pension. We’d calculate your ERS pension using the final average salary (FAS) you earned while working as a bus driver. We’d then use the FAS you earned as a fire fighter to calculate your PFRS pension.

And, since you’d have an ERS pension and a PFRS pension, you would need to choose a beneficiary for each in the event of your death.

Dual membership in NYSLRS is nothing fancy—just make sure to follow your retirement plan in each system.

If you have any questions about dual membership, please contact us.