Tag Archives: members

Debt and Retirement

If you’re planning to retire in the near future, it’s a good idea to take inventory of the debts you owe. Why start your next life chapter burdened with debt and interest payments?

A high priority should be any loans you have taken from NYSLRS. You cannot pay off your loan after you retire. If you have an outstanding balance when you retire, it will permanently reduce your pension. For example, if a 60-year-old Tier 3 or 4 member of the Employees’ Retirement System retires this year owing $10,000, the annual reduction would be $560.50. And that reduction would continue even if the total reduction exceeds the amount owed. What’s more, at least part of the balance would be subject to federal taxes. Learn more about paying of a NYSLRS loan.
Debt and Retirement — How a NYSLRS Loan could affect your retirement
Another priority is paying off credit cards. The average American household with credit card debt owes more than $16,000 and pays about $1,300 a year in interest, according to a recent analysis of federal data.

Fortunately, getting a handle on your credit card debt has gotten easier. A recent federal law requires credit card statements to carry a “Minimum Payment Warning.” This tells you how long it will take, and how much it will cost, to pay off your balance if you only make minimum payments. It also tells you how much you need to pay each month to pay off the balance in three years.

If you have more than one credit card balance, most financial advisers recommend you pay as much as you can on the card with the highest interest. Pay at least the minimum, preferably more, on lower-interest cards until the high-interest card is paid off. But some advisers say it might be better to pay off the card with the smallest balance first. That will give you a sense of accomplishment, which could make the process seem less daunting.

Mortgage balances make up two-thirds of the $12.6 trillion in U.S. household debt. But should you strive to pay off your mortgage before you retire? Financial advisers differ on that question, so do your research to consider all the factors.

Read more about debt and retirement in our publication Straight Talk About Financial Planning For Your Retirement.

Filing Your Application for Retirement

You’ve carefully planned your retirement, received your benefits estimate and are ready to take the big step. But before you can start receiving a pension, you’ll need to complete and submit your Application for Service Retirement (RS6037). You can also get a copy of the form from your employer or by contacting our Call Center.

Timing is important. We must have your application on file at least 15 days, but not more than 90 days, before your retirement date. (The 15-day rule does not apply if you are over 70 or left the public payroll before age 55.)

Be sure to list all of you public employment on the form. If you’ve ever been a member of another public retirement system in New York State, you’ll need to note that as well. Because your application is a legal document, you must sign it in the presence of a notary public. Many members make an appointment at a Consultation Site to file their applications. Our information representatives can notarize your application, help you with your paperwork and answer any questions.

Filing for Retirement

If you don’t wish to file in person, you can send your application by mail. Mailing the application “Certified Mail — Return Receipt Requested” will help you track this important document. Certified mail is also a good idea if you are close to a filing deadline because we consider the day it was mailed as the filing date. The mailing address is:

NYSLRS
110 State Street
Albany, NY 12244-0001

At the same time you submit your application you can also file a W-4P, so federal taxes can be withheld from your payments, and a Direct Deposit Enrollment Application, so your pension can be deposited directly into your bank account. If you’ve had a recent pension estimate, you can submit a payment option election form along with your retirement application. You should also submit a photocopy of proof of your date of birth

For more information, read our booklet “Life Changes: How to Prepare to Retire” or contact us.

Power of Attorney

Power of AttorneyA Power of Attorney document (POA) lets a friend or family member you trust make decisions for you in your legal, financial and business dealings. It can be a helpful tool in case of emergency, hospitalization or unexpected admission to a nursing home.

Usually, NYSLRS can’t release benefit information to anyone without your say-so — even close family members. However, once we have a copy on record, we can discuss your pension with an agent you choose in your POA.

On the other hand, you need to understand the importance and considerable impact of a POA. Once you sign one, your agent can do more than request information; they can change your address with NYSLRS or even adjust your tax withholding — all without asking you. Some POAs include something called a statutory gift rider. If yours does, your agent will also be able to redirect your deposits to a joint bank account. (We can’t ever deposit money into an account that does not have your name on it.)

If you’re thinking about a POA, NYSLRS offers a form that combines the New York State statutory POA with a gift rider. This form meets all of New York State’s legal requirements, and it’s limited to retirement benefit transactions. For example, it won’t serve as a healthcare proxy. You can find the form at www.osc.state.ny.us/retire/forms/poa.pdf.

It’s important to consult an attorney before you execute a power of attorney document or anything similar.

How Much Will My Pension Be?

Estimate Your Pension

For anyone thinking about retirement, one big question looms: How much money will I have to live on after I stop working? Your NYSLRS pension is a lifetime benefit. Having a good idea of what that monthly amount will be is essential to effective retirement planning. Fortunately, we offer tools to help you estimate your future pension.

Most members* can use our Benefit Projection Calculator to estimate their pension. You can use this calculator even if your planned retirement date is a long way off. The calculator provides estimates based on information you enter. By changing each variable (date of retirement, average salary, beneficiary information), you can see the impact it would have on your pension benefit.
how to estimate pension infographic
If you are a vested member who has enough NYSLRS service to be eligible for a pension, you can request a benefit projection by calling our automated information line at 1-866-805-0990 (518-474-7736 in the Albany, New York area). This service is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

If you are nearing retirement eligibility and you aren’t certain that you have credit for all of your NYSLRS-eligible employment, complete and submit a Request for Estimate (RS6030) form. If you are a member of the Employees’ Retirement System (ERS), you may use this form if you will be eligible to retire within five years. Members of the Police and Fire Retirement System (PFRS) can submit this form within 18 months of their retirement eligibility date.

As part of your retirement planning process, you may also want to check on your Social Security benefits.

*At this time, you cannot use this calculator if you are in ERS Tier 5 or 6; PFRS Tier 3, 5 or 6; or certain special plans.

Getting Your Affairs In Order

Are you affairs in order? Image of filing cabinet.Spring is here, and it’s time for a little spring cleaning. This year, while you’re cleaning under the couch, reorganizing the garage and raking the yard, why not tidy up your important papers too?

We all accumulate a lot of documents over a lifetime — things like birth certificates, diplomas, deeds, wills and insurance policies. If you’re like most people, you probably have papers stuffed in drawers, filing cabinets or boxes in the attic. If you ever needed an important document, do you think you could find it? What’s more, if something happened to you, will your loved ones be able to find what they need to get your affairs in order?

Your important documents and contact information should be kept in a secure place in your home. These items should include personal documents, such as your passport, birth certificate, marriage certificate, will and burial instructions. Also include information about your retirement, income taxes, bank accounts, credit card and online accounts. And don’t forget the names and phone numbers of your attorney, accountant, stock broker, financial planner, insurance agent and executor of your will.

To make this a little easier, we’ve developed a form called Where My Assets Are. This form can be used as a checklist to help you organize your important papers. It will also help you or your loved ones locate these documents when they are needed. It is a good idea to review and update this information regularly.

Where My Assets Are Thumbnail

Where My Assets Are (PDF)

You should be aware that your safe deposit box may be sealed when you die. Don’t keep burial instructions, power of attorney or your will in a safe deposit box because these items may not be available until a probate judge orders the box to be opened. However, a joint lessee of the box, or someone authorized by you, would be permitted to open the box to examine and copy your burial instructions.

Welcome New Members

Welcome to new members of the New York State and Local Retirement System (NYSLRS).

NYSLRS is here to help you plan for a financially secure retirement. Your retirement may be far in the future, but decisions you make now will have a big impact on your later years. Here are a few things you should know:

How Pensions Work

A NYSLRS pension is a defined benefit plan. Under this type of plan, once you are eligible for a pension and apply for retirement, you will receive a monthly payment for your lifetime. Your pension benefits are determined by a preset formula set by law. However, many employees in the United States, particularly in the private sector, are enrolled in 401(k)-style plans. The ultimate value of a 401(k) plan is based on the contributions made and investment returns. While 401(k) plans and other individual retirement accounts are a way to supplement your pension and Social Security payments, they do not provide the same level of security as defined benefit plans. Unlike your pension, these plans do not guarantee a lifetime benefit. Learn more about how pensions work.

New Members Checklist

Service Credit

Your NYSLRS pension will be based on factors such as your tier, retirement plan, age at retirement, final average salary, and service credit. One year of full-time employment with a participating employer is equal to a one year of service credit. Part-time employment is prorated. You may also be able to buy service credit for previous public employment or military service, which in most cases would increase your pension.

Start Saving Now

Because having a defined benefit pension plan is only one part of building a financially secure future, it’s essential that you save additional money for retirement. State workers and employees of participating local governments can take advantage of the New York State Deferred Compensation Plan. You can start by having as little as $10 deducted from each paycheck. You may choose how your money will be invested from a variety of options. Because of how compound interest works, the earlier you start saving, the better off you’ll be.

More Information

You’ll find more information in our booklet Membership in a Nutshell. We also publish booklets about specific retirement plans. If you know which system you’re in (Employees’ Retirement System or Police and Fire Retirement System) and your tier, you should be able to find your plan. If you are not sure what plan you’re in, ask your employer.

Overtime Limits for Tier 5 and 6 Members

The exact formula used in calculating your NYSLRS pension varies by tier and plan, but your credited service and final average salary (FAS) are the core variables. You earn service credit for paid service with participating employers and you also may claim it for some previous public service. FAS is the average wage you earned during the time period when your earnings were highest (36 consecutive months for Tier 5 and 60 consecutive months for Tier 6).

Your FAS can include overtime pay that you earned during the FAS period. However, for Tier 5 and 6 members, there are limits to how much overtime can be used to calculate your pension.

Members and employers aren’t required to make contributions on overtime pay above the limit, and your employer shouldn’t report overtime above the ceiling to us. While you can earn overtime beyond the limit, anything over will not count toward your FAS or your retirement benefit.

Tier 5 Overtime Limits

For Tier 5 Employees’ Retirement System (ERS) members, the limit changes each calendar year. The overtime ceiling for Tier 5 increases each calendar year by 3 percent. This year, the overtime ceiling for Tier 5 ERS members is $18,448.11. In 2018, it will be $19,001.55. For Police and Fire Retirement System (PFRS) members, the overtime limit is 15 percent of your regular earnings each calendar year.

Tier 5 & 6 Overtime Limits

Tier 6 Overtime Limits

For Tier 6 ERS members, the cap follows the fiscal year (April 1 through March 31), not the calendar year. For 2016-2017, the limit is $15,721. Come April that will increase to $16,048. The limit is adjusted for inflation based on the annual Consumer Price Index (CPI). The overtime ceiling for Tier 6 PFRS members is 15 percent of your regular earnings each calendar year.

Find more information about the overtime limit, FAS and retirement calculations in your plan booklet, available on our Publications page.

Service Credit and Elected Officials

As public employees in New York State, elected and appointed officials are usually NYSLRS members. However, their compensation generally isn’t based on an hourly rate, and their irregular hours can make a typical timekeeping system impractical. So, how do we fairly and accurately credit their service in our system?

In 1975, Regulation 315.4  of the New York Codes, Rules and Regulations (NYCRR) established a process for reporting time worked by elected and appointed officials, which we’ve used since with periodic revision.

The Reporting Process

  1. Record of activities (ROA). For three full months, from the start of the term or appointment, the official tracks time spent on work-related activities. This includes things like answering constituent correspondence and phone calls; preparing for and attending board and committee meetings; and attending employer-sponsored forums. They must leave out time spent on call; attending campaign events, political rallies or private meetings; or socializing after board meetings. Officials have 150 days to submit an ROA to the secretary or clerk of the governing board. (Tier 1 members are not required to keep a ROA.)
  2. Reporting resolution. When the governing board receives the official’s ROA, it checks the ROA against the official duties of the position and excludes any improper entries. Based on this record, the board adopts a resolution establishing both the average number of days worked by the official each month and the length of a standard work day (SWD) for the official.
  3. Public notice. After passing the resolution, the governing board must post it on the board’s public website for at least 30 days or, if the board has no public website, on the official sign-board or at the main entrance to the clerk’s office. After 30 days, the governing board has 15 days to file the resolution with NYSLRS.
  4. Next term. An ROA can be valid for up to eight years, but if the official begins a new term or is reappointed before then, NYSLRS needs a new ROA and a new reporting resolution. An official, who feels that the previous ROA still accurately represents the time worked, can certify that in writing in lieu of a new ROA.

Governing boards must keep officials’ ROAs on file for at least 30 years. Any official who does not submit an ROA will receive a warning from NYSLRS. If that goes unheeded, member benefits, including estimates, tier reinstatements and requests for previous service credit will be suspended, and time worked during this period will be excluded from the individual’s pension benefit calculation.

Visit our website for the full details about reporting regulations for elected and appointed officials.

Are You Prepared for a Long Retirement?

Are you planning for a long retirement?We all look forward to a long, happy and financially secure retirement. But as you plan for retirement, “how long?” is an important question.

People are living longer. A 55-year-old man can expect to live another 25 years, to about 80. Women tend to live three or four years longer. But these are only averages. More than 36,000 current NYSLRS retirees are over 85, and more than 3,000 have passed the 95 mark. In fact, in the state fiscal year that ended in March 2016, 336 NYSLRS’ retirees were 101 or older. Considering that many public employees retire at 55, retirement could last 45 years or more.

As you plan for retirement, you need to ask yourself, will I have enough money to maintain a comfortable life for decades to come? Members of the Employees’ Retirement System (ERS) who retired in 2016 are receiving an average monthly pension of $2,364. The average Social Security benefit for a retired worker was $1,355, as of November 2016.

Retirement savings are also a crucial asset, but half of U.S. households with members aged 55 or older have no retirement savings, according to a recent report by the U.S. Government Accountability Office. If you have no retirement savings, it is never too late to start. An easy way to get started is through the New York State Deferred Compensation Plan, a retirement savings program created for New York State employees and employees of participating public agencies.