Tag Archives: investment

A Look Inside NYSLRS

Want an inside view of NYSLRS and the New York State Common Retirement Fund (Fund)? Curious about how the Fund is managed and how well its investments are performing? Then check out the latest Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (CAFR).

The 2017 CAFR, which covers the state fiscal year that ended on March 31, 2017, is chock full of facts and figures that offer a detailed look at the Retirement System and the Fund. The biggest story is the financial health of the Fund. The Fund’s assets were valued at $192.4 billion at the end of the fiscal year and continued to grow, reaching an estimated value of $201.3 billion as of September 30, 2017. The average return on Fund investments in fiscal year 2017 was 11.48 percent, well above the long-term expected rate of return of 7 percent.

The soundness of NYSLRS was confirmed by several recent independent studies, which concluded that the New York State’s pension system is one of the best-funded public pension systems in the nation. And that means NYSLRS’ 652,324 members and 452,455 retirees and beneficiaries can rest assured their pensions will be there for them in retirement.

A Look Inside NYSLRS

The average pension for an Employees’ Retirement System (ERS) retiree was $23,026; the average for a Police and Fire Retirement System was $49,123. In all, NYSLRS paid out $11.3 billion in benefits during the fiscal year. (Fund investment earnings covered 75 percent of the cost of these benefits.) But NYSLRS pension payments don’t just benefit the system’s retirees and beneficiaries. Because 78 percent of NYSLRS retirees and beneficiaries live in New York, $9.1 billion worth of benefits stayed in the State. And that money supported local businesses, paid local taxes and generated economic development statewide.

An Award-Winning Publication

NYSLRS received a Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting for the 2016 CAFR. The Certificate of Achievement is a national award recognizing excellence in the preparation of state and local government financial reports. NYSLRS has won this award for the last 13 years.

Compounding: A Great Way For Your Money to Grow

Financial security just doesn’t happen – it takes planning. When planning for retirement, it’s important to start saving and investing early. After working hard to earn your money, you want your money to work hard for you too. The more time your money has to grow, the better off you’ll be.

Compounding is one way for your money to earn money. When your money is compounded, it increases in value by earning interest on both the principal and accumulated interest. This is a little different from earning simple interest. Let’s see how they both work.

How Simple Interest Works

Simple interest is a return that pays you a certain percentage based on every dollar you put in your account.

Let’s say you opened a savings account with $100 in January. If the bank paid 5 percent annual interest on that deposit, you’d receive five cents for every dollar in your savings account for the whole year. At the end of the year, you’d have $105. That’s $5 more than the principal amount you started with. Any interest you’d earn after the first year would still be based on the principal amount of $100.

How Compounding Interest Works

While you receive some extra money with simple interest, compounded interest can give you more bang for your buck.

Compounding interest

Let’s look at the above example again, but use compounded interest this time. If that $105 remained in your account, and the bank paid out another 5 percent interest, by the end of the second year you’d have $110.25 in your account. That $105 increased by $5.25. Not only did you earn interest on your original $100 in year one, you earned interest on year one’s interest. That’s the great thing about compounding. In just two short years, your money has earned $110.25. If we were still using simple interest, you’d only have $110 after two years.

If you’re thinking about boosting your personal savings for retirement, look into accounts that use compound interest. The sooner you can start saving, the more time your money can grow.

Other Sources:
How to Calculate Simple and Compound Interest